Solar Eclipse Interplanetary Getaway

EXPERIENCE THE SOLAR ECLIPSE April 8, 2024

EXPERIENCE THE SOLAR ECLIPSE

By now you have probably heard, on April 8th, 2024 the moon and the sun will do their dance and cast the world into darkness. Sort of. While certain parts of New York State will be in the path of totality (i.e. the most complete darkness), the phenomenon will only last a few minutes.

By now you have probably heard, on April 8th, 2024 the moon and the sun will do their dance and cast the world into darkness. Some of us have experienced a partial solar eclipse in our lifetime, but a total solar eclipse, in the same location, only comes around every 400 years! That's a long time to wait for the next one to roll around so maybe 2024 is your year! So if you're thinking yes, I have to see it, then we want to make your visit extra fun!

PATH OF TOTALITY

New York will be in the direct path of totality and there will be some great places to view this magnificent event throughout the state. Sitting just below the path of totality lies Steuben County. Located in the heart of the Finger Lakes, Steuben is home to world-class museums, award-winning wineries and a beautiful lake, Keuka Lake.

New York will be in the direct path of totality and there will be some great places to view this magnificent event throughout the state. Sitting just below the path of totality lies Steuben County. Located in the heart of the Finger Lakes, Steuben is home to world-class museums, award-winning wineries and a beautiful lake, Keuka Lake.

Solar Eclipse Interplanetary Weekend Getaway

Solar Eclipse Interplanetary Getaway

While total solar eclipses are a rare and unusual to witness (the next eclipse that will traverse the contiguous United States is slated for 2044), we have been embracing the solar system for quite some time here in the Finger Lakes. From Corning’s role making the world’s largest telescope to the special glass it developed for space shuttle windows, from Walter Taylor’s infamous blackout parties at Bully Hill to daredevil speed demons like Glenn Curtiss who helped pave the way for space travel, from Heron Hill Winery's most popular wine for the past twenty years (Eclipse White and Eclipse Red) to a renowned glass artist whose wife is an astronaut. As a prelude to viewing the solar eclipse in person, spend a fun-filled weekend Exploring Steuben and our connection to the stars.

While total solar eclipses are a rare and unusual to witness (the next eclipse that will traverse the contiguous United States is slated for 2044), we have been embracing the solar system for quite some time here in the Finger Lakes.

Day 1 Corning, NY - Friday April 5th, 2024 Telescopes, Space Shuttles, Megaplanets, and Otherworldly HeeChees Glass loves light. Only seems appropriate to take advantage of the sun before its light gets blotted out and what better place to do so than in “America’s Crystal City” where you will find the world’s largest museum devoted to glass art and artifacts and an historic district with over 100 boutiques, galleries, studios and restaurants. Stroll the small town where, in 1880, glassblowers helped Thomas Edison’s incandescent lamp find its way out into the world and learn about the magic and mysteries of glass including Corning’s longstanding connection with the stars.

World’s Largest Telescope

World’s Largest Telescope

Courtesy: The Corning Museum of Glass

“In 1928, the famed astronomer, George Ellery Hale, had a vision. He wanted to build the world’s largest telescope at Palomar Mountain in California—a research instrument that would allow scientists to view the skies as never before.” Hale enlisted the aid of Corning Glass Works and in 1934 the company attempted creating the worlds largest glass mirror at 200 inches (double the largest mirror at the time). During the pouring, a mishap occurred and the attempt was ruined, however Corning’s physicist and engineer decided to let the mold cool anyway turning that failure into an opportunity to experiment in making the world’s largest single piece of glass. After all, how often would anyone get a chance to see how something that enormous handled the annealing process (the gradual cooling necessary to prevent the glass from cracking or breaking)? Corning successfully made a second mirror which took a year to cool (or anneal) properly before making its way to California. You can see the “imperfect disk” on display at The Corning Museum of Glass. (One Museum Way, Corning, NY 14830) You can also learn more about “The 200-inch Disk and the Hale Reflecting Telescope” and see images HERE. But if you visit The Corning Museum of Glass, you can see that first “imperfect disk” on display which is so much cooler!

“In 1928, the famed astronomer, George Ellery Hale, had a vision. He wanted to build the world’s largest telescope at Palomar Mountain in California—a research instrument that would allow scientists to view the skies as never before.” Hale enlisted the aid of Corning Glass Works and in 1934 the company attempted creating the worlds largest glass mirror at 200 inches (double the largest mirror at the time). During the pouring, a mishap occurred and the attempt was ruined, however Corning’s physicist and engineer decided to let the mold cool anyway turning that failure into an opportunity to experiment in making the world’s largest single piece of glass. After all, how often would anyone get a chance to see how something that enormous handled the annealing process (the gradual cooling necessary to prevent the glass from cracking or breaking)? Corning successfully made a second mirror which took a year to cool (or anneal) properly before making its way to California. You can see the “imperfect disk” on display at The Corning Museum of Glass. (One Museum Way, Corning, NY 14830) You can also learn more about “The 200-inch Disk and the Hale Reflecting Telescope” and see images HERE. But if you visit The Corning Museum of Glass, you can see that first “imperfect disk” on display which is so much cooler!

Space Shuttle Windows

Space Shuttle Windows

Corning Museum of Glass is more than a museum of art and history (we’re talking the world’s largest museum devoted to glass art and artifacts), it’s also a place where you can learn about science thanks to the Innovation Center where you can also learn about the special glass needed to make windows for the space shuttle (glass needed to withstand the extreme heat generated on re-entry into the earth’s atmosphere). That same special heat-resistant glass is used today in the museum’s hot glass shop to provide behind-the-scenes views of hot glass in a furnace that’s over 2,100°. Read more about the space shuttle glass HERE.

Corning Museum of Glass is more than a museum of art and history (we’re talking the world’s largest museum devoted to glass art and artifacts), it’s also a place where you can learn about science thanks to the Innovation Center where you can also learn about the special glass needed to make windows for the space shuttle (glass needed to withstand the extreme heat generated on re-entry into the earth’s atmosphere). That same special heat-resistant glass is used today in the museum’s hot glass shop to provide behind-the-scenes views of hot glass in a furnace that’s over 2,100°. Read more about the space shuttle glass HERE.

MEGAPLANET

Courtesy: Josh SImpson

Renowned glass artist, Josh Simpson has a special connection with space which comes through in his remarkable paperweights, including his 100-pound megaplanet which he he was commissioned to make by the Corning Museum of Glass as the museum’s 1,000th paperweight. Simpson’s wife is astronaut Cady Coleman who spent time in space and has inspired some of his most stunning work. Learn More.

Renowned glass artist, Josh Simpson has a special connection with space which comes through in his remarkable paperweights, including his 100-pound megaplanet which he he was commissioned to make by the Corning Museum of Glass as the museum’s 1,000th paperweight. Simpson’s wife is astronaut Cady Coleman who spent time in space and has inspired some of his most stunning work. Learn More.

HEECHEES

Originally inspired by the novels of science fiction master Frederick Pohl, Heechees have become the calling card of Vitrix Glass Studios located on historic Market Street. In Pohl’s iconic novels, Heechees are an advanced fictional race of interstellar travelers who explored Earth’s solar system long before mankind emerged. Vitrix’s fascinating hand-blown glass pieces transcend all categorization, expressing a fantastical personality all their own.

Courtesy: Vitrix Hot Glass Studio

With their fantastical shape of colorful whorls adorning a clear or black stem, these abstract glass sculptures resemble the swirling bands of light that make up the Milky Way. The individual ribbons of glass carefully wrapped one-over-the-other are not only the most challenging aspects of creating the Heechee, but they also convey a sense of movement, as if traveling among the stars, and the inescapable influence of gravity which, it turns out, is an essential tool used by master glass artist Tom Kelly in creating these unique and colorful pieces. On weekdays, during working hours, visitors to the Vitrix shop can watch Tom and his team making various glass objects ranging from snow people to HeeChees.